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Stadium Rock Electronica with a dash of Cowbell

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The DFA
The DFA Remixes: Chapter Two
Astralwerks

The producing duo of Tim Goldsworthy and James Murphy that make up the DFA have released another collection of redone and undone tracks with "The DFA Remixes: Chapter Two" (Astralwerks). Clocking in at almost seventy-two minutes, the album journeys through a disparate but not dischordant pack of unlikely artists.

Opening with Montreal-based DJ Tiga Sontag's "Far From Home", the DFA have more than picked up the pace of the original, they've somehow anthemized a set of lyrics that wasn't even much of a chorus. The DFA did more than just turn up the tempo: from what was plodding and introspective rumination, the end result has an extroverted and confident kick. This is a much more organic take on the original with plenty of real drum sounds and a filtered/phased organ sound reminiscent of the Who's "Won't Be Fooled Again", think again: stadium rock anthem feel set to electronica layers.

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Junior Senior's "Shake Your Coconuts" gets the full treatment in track two. Junior Senior is a ridiculously upbeat Danish duo that got some play in 2003 with a hilarious pixel animated video for their single "Move Your Feet". This is the kind of music my daughter loved to dance to when she was 3 years old – it's repetitive and hyper and she is on to more sophisticated fare now but I think that even she would appreciate what was done with this tune. Again, the DFA went with an organic start to what had previously been very electronic. There's a real bass playing on there, noodly electric guitars, and plenty of drums and bottles and, yes, cowbell. The DFA spares us a lot of the lyrics and the previously obnoxious chorus, and doles them out sparingly which makes this a much better experience.