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Movie Review: The Number 23 Blows Chunks

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You know the screenplay that Donald Kaufman (Nicolas Cage) is writing in Adaptation, the hackneyed, high concept spec script called The Three? Well, Joel Schumacher and Jim Carrey went and made that movie. Sure, they added a dopey numerology twist and tacked "Number Twenty" onto the title, but it's the same film, complete with the idiotic "twist".

I'm sorry, am I ruining it for you? Don't worry. If you're stupid enough to waste your time and money on this turd, knowing more ahead of time will be the least of your problems.

After reading my venom above, you should know that I went in prepared to give The Number 23 a fair shake.

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For the first few minutes I dared to dream that Carrey was delivering a performance that was somehow a cross between his characters in Ace Ventura and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (he plays a sad-sack dog catcher), but alas 'twas not to be.

As soon as the main plot device -- a book that details one man's descent into madness fueled by his discovery that everything is somehow related to the number 23 -- appears, Carrey switches gears and does the typical "guy going crazy with obsession" part he wasn't born to play. I would detail the intricacies of the hole-ridden plot, but frankly it's not worth wasting any more precious brain energy on it.

Suffice it to say that it's the sort of drool-inducing high concept hokum that should have been put to rest at the turn of the century.

And by that I mean 1899.