SoCal Got A Lightning Show With Thunderous Applause

This photo, taken by Mike Eliason of the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, shows lightning strikes over Santa Barbara on March 5, 2019. (Courtesy Mike Eliason via Twitter)

We're all so adorable with our West Coast wonder. Southern California isn't known for big thunderstorms, so when one does roll in, many of us understandably freak out and/or tell the internet about it.

It was hard to miss the show last night, with bolts of electricity punctuating the sky, followed by loud roars late into the night. Plenty of local tweeters captured the lightning in a digital bottle for all of us to enjoy.

The storm also created hazards at Los Angeles International Airport Tuesday night, where terminals lost power and a flight had to return to the airport after being struck by lightning, according to NBC Los Angeles.

The weather event is such a novelty in Southern California the National Weather Service shared some tips for how to watch the storm safely, including not being in a bathtub during an electrical storm. Really.

"The metal pipes that bring water into the house can also transmit the electrical charge to the tub," NWS officials wrote. So now that's a thing we know and can fear.

STORM HAZARDS & WARNINGS

The atmospheric river storm system was expected to drop more heavy rain to the region Wednesday, with up to 4 inches in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties and 1 ½ inch in L.A. County.

That brought the risk of flooding and debris flows, especially in recent wildfire burn zones. A flood advisory was issued for L.A. County through 10:30 Wednesday morning, but the heavier rain had moved out of the area around 11 a.m.

The morning rain also caused its usual trouble on local roads, including crashes, flooding, mudslides and rock slides.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

For updates throughout the day, including lists of road closures, evacuation orders and flood warnings, check the following sites:

UPDATES:

12:58 p.m.: This article was updated with the latest information from weather forecasters.

This article was originally published at 8 a.m.