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Climate and Environment

California Looks To Ban Deep-Sea Mining

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The California Seabed Mining Protection Act would protect 2500 square miles of seafloor. San Fernando Valley Assemblywoman Luz Rivas says mining those materials could put coastal ecosystems at risk.
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Waters off the coast of California don't receive any protection from deep-sea miners, but a new bill seeks to change that.

So, you may be wondering. Are active mining operations happening in California? Not currently. Still, interest remains from mining companies seeking to extract metal and minerals to build new renewable energy technology.

The California Seabed Mining Protection Act would protect 2,500 square miles of seafloor. San Fernando Valley Assemblywoman Luz Rivas says mining those materials could put coastal ecosystems at risk.

"Seabed mining companies are, are definitely peddling this idea that seabed mining is is a necessity given that we are in need of some of these resources and materials for different technologies," Rivas said.

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According to the legislator, California waters are home to gold, phosphorite, titanium and other resources. But she adds California companies are starting to move away from marine resources.

California would join Oregon and Washington, who both have outlawed the practice.

What questions do you have about Southern California?