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Mia Bonadonna

  • Arts and Entertainment
    Focusing on the fall and eventual heart-warming rise through life of Sacre's younger brother, the script works itself out like an autobiographically twisted family tree. While in many ways standing as a totem for all families born out of common, all-forgiving eccentricity, eccentricity, Sacre channels his brothers as seen through the eyes of their elders to tell a story that is full of circumspect authenticity, loving homage, and luck-filled cadences.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    The pressure generated from making up a play on the spot is always redirected into a simmering, contagious warmth imbued with gravitas. The set for the production is simple, but does give the audience the sense that they are willing spies, and at times, voyeurs, into the lives of the central characters. What the production lack in over-rehearsed polish, it makes up for in raw, gritty authenticity that is absolutely enjoyable.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    If you threw Lisa Frank stationary, Busby Berkely, and an assortment of club drugs in a blender, you would end up with the Priscilla-worthy concoction of boisterous staging that Philips, Brian Thomson (set sesign), Tim Chappel (costuming), and Lizzy Gardiner (costuming) have wrought.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    Many of the performers use theatre to overcome fears after being thrust into blindness in adulthood from reasons that range from domestic abuse to being a shooting victim. Others use it to gain confidence in a dark world that is predisposed to those that can see.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    Slipping is a bit of a mixed bag in terms of what it brings to audiences, although the net outcome is surely a positive one. The New York Times rightly described Slipping as a "Gay Rebel Without a Cause" story following its New York premier, and in being so it accurately captures the confusion-driven teenage mindset.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    Taboo-prodding drama, Alabama Baggage, is playing at Theatre Asylum. A chance graveside meeting reveals that two previously unacquainted men were sexually abused by the same pedophile during childhood.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    What makes Mike Tyson's performance inherently different from other one-man shows is that he isn't self-pitying or whiny or looking for acceptance. He works the stage warmly and graciously, wholly unfettered by pretentiousness. Tyson's delivery is not perfect, but his uniquely-honed personality shines through an undeniable stage presence marked by humor and earnest simplicity.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    The last fucking thing we want in the theatre is strict journalism. I don't want strict journalism in the theatre. That is not why I am there. The lights go down, I am din the dark, I'm watching something on stage, not reading the newspaper in my living room.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    Having the actors reenact the iconic scenes from Deep Throat is a clever and engaging touch. The play doesn't always flow well, but the trade off is that you get to bask in the warm glow of gorgeous naked actors.
  • Arts and Entertainment
    Set in a quaint British seaside village during the 1950s, Kenny's script follows Esme (a young girl) and her Granddad Stan as they come to terms with the death of her grandmother. Attempting to spare Esme grief, Granddad initially tells her that her grandma has joined the circus as a tightrope walker. As the characters create new norms for their family, the play touches upon themes such as growing up, life changes, home, family, tradition, and longing. Under the direction of Debbie Devine, Walking the Tightrope is funny, sweet, moving, and perfectly enjoyable for both adults and little ones over the age of six.

Stories by Mia Bonadonna

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