Support for LAist comes from
We Explain L.A.
Stay Connected

Share This

Arts and Entertainment

Rosie Thomas/El Perro Del Mar 3/13

LAist relies on your reader support, not paywalls.
Freely accessible local news is vital. Please power our reporters and help keep us independent with a donation today.
5b2bf8924488b3000926d295-original.jpg

Earlier this week we checked out El Perro Del Mar and opening act Rosie Thomas at--well, here's the problem: We're not sure where we were, because we weren't where we were told we'd be. In what in the end was a serendipitous turn of events that brought us to a cool venue, we began our evening searching for the Rec Center Studios in Echo Park, only to find first a sign taped behind a gated door telling us to enter in the back, then a person in the back telling us to go a couple of blocks up on Sunset near The Echo. We found two lines of people on either side of an unmarked door, and picked the "wrong" line apparently--we went with the excuse that our psychic abilities haven't been performing to par lately, rather than, oh, say, the fact that there were no signs or markings anywhere indicating what line was for whom. We may well have been at The Echo; we were down some stairs and in a pretty great space. Any readers know for sure where we were? Let us know!

But enough about that. Our psychic skills might not be up to par, but the evening's performers most certainly were. Soon after making ourselves comfortable in the basement space on an appropriated cushioned bench, Seattle-based Rosie Thomas took the stage. She is a study in opposites, being that her speaking voice has a diminutive cadence and a sort of Edith Ann or cartoonesque connotation, whereas her singing voice is lush and rich and full of powerful emotion. Between songs--many from her newly re-released album These Friends of Mine and many, like "Wedding Day" and "Since You've Been Around" from earlier releases--she entertained us with tangential anectodes, many of which were noticeably funnier and more cleverly delivered than most material offered the viewers of television comedies. Thomas' folksy, melodic songs are chiefly love songs--love lost, love craved, love celebrated, and she included a touching cover of R.E.M.'s "The One I Love."