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Miracle Mile's 6th Street May Undergo A 'Road Diet' To Make Room For Bikes And Pedestrians

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Editor's Note: This story originally made it seem as if the road diet was definitely going to happen, but the Department of Transportation still needs to determine whether or not the project gets implemented. The story has been updated to reflect this.A segment of 6th Street that spans a significant portion of Miracle Mile may soon be slimmed down to car traffic in order to make more room for pedestrians and cyclists. Urbanize L.A. reports that the Mid City West Council's Board of Directors voted unanimously last month to enact a "road diet" that would transform a one-mile stretch between La Brea and Fairfax avenues. Don't get too excited yet, though. The Los Angeles Department of Transportation still needs to determine whether or not the project gets implemented. Councilmember David Ryu has also voiced concerns about moving forward with a potential road diet while there is a Traffic Management Plan (TMP) currently in place for the Purple Line Extension, as the road diet could exacerbate the traffic concerns. In the meantime, here's a preview of what the changes would look like if the plan gets approved:

Fairfax to Masselin Avenue Eliminate two automobile travel lanes and narrow curbside parking lanes to create a center turn lane and bike lanes.

Hauser Boulevard to Dunsmuir Avenue

Eliminate two automobile travel lanes and narrow curbside parking lanes to create a center turn lane and bike lanes.

Dunsmuir to Cochran Avenue

Narrow curbside parking to create center turn lane and bike lanes.

Cochran to La Brea

Narrow curbside parking to create center turn lane and sharrows.

The Mid City West Council posted some helpful infographics on their Facebook page, also compiled by Curbed, that visualize how these changes will look for drivers, and pedestrians and cyclists who have the prospect of slightly-more-safe mobility to look forward to. Here's an example:
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[h/t Curbed]