Support for LAist comes from
We Explain L.A.
Stay Connected

Share This

Arts and Entertainment

Michael Connelly's Echo Park Hits Stores Today

Stories like these are only possible with your help!
Your donation today keeps LAist independent, ready to meet the needs of our city, and paywall free. Thank you for your partnership, we can't do this without you.

5b2c666b4488b300092851c0-original.jpg

We're not going to sit here and tell you how thought provoking or intellectually stimulating Michael Connelly's Echo Park is. Or how the soon-to-be top ten bestseller will change your life. Because, it won't do those two things.

But we'll tell you this: there's nothing better than this fun and adventurous crime novel that winds you through the streets of modern day LA chasing serial killers, crooked cops, city attorneys and cute FBI agents. And we totally dig LA + fun + books.

Echo Park is the 13th book in the Detective Harry Bosch series (short for Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch) by the LA expat, Connelly. Bosch, an LAPD detective in the Open-Unsolved Unit in the Robbery/Homicide Division, is passionate about his job. So much, he retired and came back, not letting go of certain cold cases he's personally attached to (and to him, this passion is what makes him a true detective). One of these cold cases becomes the focus of Echo Park - Marie Gesto, a young girl who disappeared in 1992. It's now 2006 and there's a fresh lead that begets the story.

Support for LAist comes from

For Locals...

If you live in LA and read this or other Connelly books, you've got the upper hand. The obvious comes with the territory such as when one character turns onto Hollywood Blvd. from La Brea, we can feel it because we've done it (but not the walk around the corner and kill a guy part). The not so obvious comes with smaller streets in the hills such as Woodrow Wilson Drive and Camrose Drive behind the Hollywood Bowl (seriously, someone can make some good cash doing a bus tour of all this).

Then, there's the fun of discovering the imperfections and inaccuracies portrayed, such as the Echo Park Blog's insight about the book's cover: "Here's the image of the American cover, too bad it appears to be Palisades Park in Santa Monica and not Echo Park."

Reality TV Reading

Connelly also bends fiction with reality when he reveals Bosch's cell phone number. What happens when you call it? We're not telling, but we're curious if there are other fiction-to-reality surprises. If we actually get our butts out to the gravesite of one of the victims, will we find anything?

Support for LAist comes from

Below, you can watch a live-action preview of the book. We knew about this before we read the book, but we refused to ruin our imaginations of what Bosch looked like, etc.

Watch at your own risk... read at your leisure.