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News

California Job Market Has Workers Heading to the Self-Help Aisles

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A report of how workers feel about the job market indicates that we Californian "workers are becoming increasingly less confident in the job market, economy and in their personal employment situation." The California Employee Confidence Index, released on Friday, has our state-wide points at 50.3, which is both a 2.5 drop, and "the lowest level seen in the history of the survey"--a dubious distinction at best.

Some of the downright depressing statistics garnered from the survey include the following:

* Sixty-three percent of workers believe the economy is getting weaker, an increase of nine percentage points from November. * Thirty-five percent of employees are likely to look for new jobs, up seven percentage points from the previous month.

* Forty-seven percent of California workers believe there to be fewer jobs available, a 10 percentage point increase since November.

Not to pour salt on the wound, but with national unemployment figures for last month being released, we may be on a downward economic spiral country-wide. Last December, "some 7,655,000 people were unemployed, meaning they were both without a job and looking for one." According to
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The Daily News: "That figure was 13.2 percent higher than the 6,760,000 figure in the previous December. In the past, a 13 percent annual rise has been the sign of a recession every time."Oh boy! A recession! Just remember, "I'm Okay, You're Okay." We're all going to be okay. Right?

Photo of an unknown man doing an unknown job in 1959 by foundphotoslj via Flickr