Support for LAist comes from
We Explain L.A.
Stay Connected

Share This

News

Chase Suspect Takes His Own Life, LAPD Rescues His Dog

LAist relies on your reader support, not paywalls.
Freely accessible local news is vital. Please power our reporters and help keep us independent with a donation today.


A police chase today in the San Fernando Valley ended when a man suspected of assault and domestic violence took his own life. Concern continued for a small dog, who jumped out of the man's truck. The chase began in Arleta at about 11:35 a.m. this morning when officers attempted to arrest a man wanted on multiple warrants, including domestic violence and assault, NBC LA reports. Police say that the man, who they described as a "known gang member" in his 40s, took off in a white Chevy truck after noticing that officers had spotted him. The man led police on a chase through surface streets and on the 5 Freeway. At one point, the man drove through the security gate of an apartment building where one of his alleged victims lives, injuring one pedestrian. The chase came to an end on Terra Bella Street near Beachy Avenue after the truck ran over a spike strip and came to a stop. The man refused to exit the truck, and aerial footage showed what appeared to be a small dog on the man's lap. After an hour, the police approached the car and found the man dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

When police opened the door of the truck, the dog jumped out and ran. The dog stayed relatively near, often running around the truck, but refused to get too close to officers.

Eventually, an Animal Regulations officer arrived and police were able to surround the dog. When the dog jumped back into the truck, officers were able to get the dog into a small carrier and remove it from the scene.

LAPD later tweeted a photo of the dog, who appears to be unharmed.

Support for LAist comes from

If someone you know exhibits warning signs of suicide: do not leave the person alone, remove any firearms, alcohol, drugs or sharp objects that could be used in a suicide attempt, and call the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or take the person to an emergency room or seek help from a medical or mental health professional.