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Frank Gehry's New Downtown Project Kind Of Looks Like Tetris Blocks

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Frank Gehry's vision for the Grand Avenue Project in Downtown may soon be seeing the light of day. Related Companies—a developer in charge of the project to transform Grand Avenue into a hub of residential and commercial buildings, restaurants, and retail shops—submitted a proposal today of Gehry's architectural plans to the City-Council panel.

The Los Angeles Times reported:

The development will be crowned by a pair of towers, one holding a 300-room SLS Hotel and the other filled with condominiums and rental apartments. A series of terraces, restaurant patios and pool decks, many of them generously landscaped, cascades down along Grand facing the concert hall.

This $650 million proposal arrives nearly a decade after the Grand Avenue Project commenced, which has moved at a snail's pace after the recession hit, according to Curbed LA and Downtown News. Grand Park was a part of that original project and was completed in 2012. The plan would be to develop the multi-use complex at what is currently a parking lot directly across from the Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall.

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“Our plan is to enrich what we consider the emerging arts and cultural district in Los Angeles,” Gehry said in a statement, according to Downtown News. “What’s been missing is the excitement and fun of a hotel, nightclubs, restaurants, shops, places to hang out. Now our plan has the potential of becoming an incredibly dynamic partner to the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the other arts and cultural institutions on Grand Avenue.”

If the proposal is approved, Related Companies hopes to break ground in 2015 and complete the project by 2019.

Related stories:
Frank Gehry Says 'L.A. Doesn't Take Architecture Seriously'