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Arts and Entertainment

Damnit, This Was Good

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Where did this Venice based collective of playwrights come from? How was it that we have never heard of Apartment A? We feel so out of touch and so enlightened at the same time.

Last weekend at the Electric Lodge in Venice, An Evening in Defense of Delight, a set of 6 new short plays by local and out-of-state playwrights, opened for a six week run. That means you have tonight plus four more weeks to experience this fantastic, laughable and introspective stagework.

"Each season we present an evening of short plays. This year, rather than collecting material, we gave the poem A Brief for the Defense by Jack Gilbert to a group of writers and asked them to write whatever the poem inspired. An Evening in Defense of Delight is six of those plays..."

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From an empty Venice apartment to an apartment off Times Square, these 6 stories take you to 2096 where a present-day mob-involved butcher is unfrozen to make a decision that will annihilate millions of lives and to a funreal home where two women guard their dead co-worker. Don't forget hotel lust and melancholy home bodies.

All this death and sadness and all the audience can do is laugh. If you want to take partake in this, and we highly recommend it, call 310-823-0710 or visit their website. Tickets are $22 and performances are at 8:00 p.m., Thursday - Saturday.