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Photos: Vamps, Vampires & Stylish Ghouls At Ace Hotel's Black & White Ball

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From tuxedoed skeletons to vicious starlets, The Black & White Ball hosted by The Black Tux at downtown's Ace Hotel brought crowds of stylish Halloween revelers in dramatic two-tone costumes.

One of our favorite Halloween parties around town, the costumes at Saturday night's second annual dance party ranged from the vintage and formal to the modern and gory. And The Theatre at Ace Hotel, the stunning 1927 gothic-inspired movie palace, served as the perfect backdrop for the evening.

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Welcome to the Ball. (Photo by Danny Jensen/LAist)
We saw plenty of witches, Draculas, angels both black and white, calacas (skeletons) for Diá de los Muertos, and many other traditional ghastly apparitions. There were also many Golden Era movie stars and starlets, some glamorous, some bloody, while others made up with grayish tones of black and white film. There was a zebra who wore little more than his stripes, at least a half dozen bobbed Mia Wallaces from Pulp Fiction (some bloodied and post-overdose), several droogs from A Clockwork Orange, and a Cruella de Vil in search of dalmatians. Some partygoers brought a splash of color for contrast, while others kept the theme casual. And then there was the guy dressed as a giant palm tree.

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The theme of the ball took an aesthetic cue from the evening's screening of the black and white Dracula from 1931, which was accompanied by a live score from Philip Glass and the Kronos Quartet. After the film, DJs Peanut Butter Wolf, Daniel T (Cosmic Kids), and Vito & Druzzi took over the decks. Some partygoers took to the chessboard dance floor in the lobby, while others danced in the aisles of the theater or just lounged in the seats.

Meanwhile, others sought the upper floors to show off their costumes, make use of the photo booth and find additional bars, including one with $5 pours of an elaborate and potent punch. Those that wandered into the alley beside the theater were treated to tarot card readings in a vintage trailer and trippy projections on the building courtesy of The BlindSpot Project.