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Cocks Leave Neighborhood, Residents Have Peace

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“Last night was the first night I could open my windows and enjoy my home undisturbed by the roosters,” a neighbor said to the Los Angeles City Animal Cruelty Task Force (ACTF). He lived near or on the 10400 block of Variel Avenue in Chatsworth where someone tipped the ACTF off to an alleged cockfighter.

But when the special task force, made up of Los Angeles police officers and detectives, animal services’ officers and city attorney’s, arrived at 35-year-old Leopoldo Barron's home, they found large quantity of methamphetamine, over a pound of marijuana, several loaded firearms, numerous fighting roosters, cockfighting implements and paraphernalia and a large quantity of U.S. currency.

Barron's immigration status is in question and if convicted, he could face up to five years in state prison, fines and deportation.

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For those interested in having fowl in an urban setting legally, you can in Los Angeles (see details below) and there's also a guy up north who blogs about urban chickens.

Chickens in Los Angeles (via a 2007 LA City Nerd story, posted with permission)


Did you know that even in the City of Los Angeles, you can raise chickens in a regular, residential zone? You don't need to be located in the agricultural zone (which still exists in many parts of the City) to raise fowl (though there are restrictions for raising horses, goats, etc.). In fact, all you need to do to raise chickens for eggs or other uses is meet a few criteria. First, the easy one is chickens (hens): they must be cooped at least 20 feet from the owner's dwelling and at least 35 feet from any neighbor's dwelling. Now, for roosters, ducks, and turkeys, you have to keep them in a coop or roost at least 20 feet from their owners swelling and at least 100 feet from the nearest neighbor's dwelling. Pretty simple, right?

I guess the question is: why in some areas do you see chickens roaming the front yards and streets even? If you see fowl or poultry roaming the streets, just call 311 and report what you see so that an animal services officer can come out and assess the situation and make sure the few, simple rules are being followed.

Info via a press release | Photo by voodoopope via Flickr