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Bobcat Fire: More Than 55K Acres Burned; Flames Close To Mt. Wilson

Updated
Published
A firefighter works at the scene of the Bobcat Fire burning on hillsides near Monrovia Canyon Park on Sept. 15, 2020. (Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images)

This story is no longer being updated. Follow our coverage of the Bobcat Fire for Friday, Sept. 18>>

Yesterday's coverage:

EVENING UPDATE

Jump to: Basics | Evacuations | Weather Conditions | About Mt. Wilson

The Bobcat Fire continues to grow in the Angeles National Forest as the firefight enters its 12th day.

Late Thursday, officials said firefighters are continuing to protect Mt. Wilson. Images from the fire scene show the flames getting increasingly close to the history observatory.

That fight continued a day after the Highway 2 yesterday, prompting new evacuation warnings for communities to the north of the fire's path where the San Gabriel Mountains meet the High Desert.

Here's what else we know about the fire so far today.

THE BASICS

  • Acreage: 55,617 acres
  • Containment: 9%
  • Resources deployed: 1,158 firefighters

The blaze erupted on Sept. 6 near the Cogswell Dam and then spread rapidly amid an intense, record-breaking heat wave, prompting evacuation orders for Mt. Wilson Observatory. The cause is under investigation.

Firefighters continue to work in steep difficult terrain with help from helicopters and planes.

Firefighters had been working to contain a spot fire that had jumped Highway 2 and burned roughly 700-1,000 acres in the area of Cooper Canyon. Officials later confirmed the blaze had crossed fully the highway near the junction with Highway 39 and continued to advance, threatening communities to the north.

Mt. Wilson Observatory still stands after a second harrowing night thanks to the efforts of firefighters who dug in to defend the historic science station as the Bobcat Fire closed in.

On Tuesday afternoon, Angeles National Forest officials reported the blaze was within 500 feet of the facility, which is arguably one of the world's most important spots for scientific discovery. Firefighters have used a variety of tactics to protect the observatory, including carving out lines by hand and with bulldozers, setting strategic backfires and using aircraft to make water drops.

The facility continued to be threatened overnight Wednesday.

CLOSURES

  • The Angeles National Forest remains closed through Sept. 21 — along with all other national forests in California
  • State Route 39 is closed at Old Gabriel Canyon Road to State Route 2
  • State Route 2 is closed from Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road to Big Pines
  • Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road
  • Mt. Wilson Road
  • Glendora Mountain Road
  • Glendora Ridge Road

EVACUATIONS

Emergency officials issued new evacuation warnings for residents in the following areas north of the fire's path:

  • North of Angeles Crest North and between Clear Creek Station and Hwy 39
  • Juniper Hills
  • Devils Punchbowl
  • Paradise Springs
  • Area east of Devils Punch Bowl Road, south of the Big Pines Hwy, north of the Big Rock Creek, and west of Jackson Lake

"If you have not already done so, gather your family, pets, important papers, medications and any emergency supplies, and be preapred to evacuate the area if ordered," officials wrote in an alert.

On Wednesday afternoon, Arcadia city officials lifted evacuation orders for residents in Arcadia and the adjacent city of Sierra Madre who live north of Elkins Avenue and east of Santa Anita Avenue. Residents of those neighborhoods were allowed to return to their homes as of 4 p.m yesterday.

Evacuation warnings remain in effect for those neighborhoods and all other communities along the foothills:

Tonight authorities issued an evacuation warning for Wrightwood and Pinon Hills. Evacuation route is Hwy 2 to Phelan or Hwy 138 to I-15.

  • Monrovia
  • Arcadia
  • Sierra Madre
  • Bradbury
  • Duarte
  • Pasadena
  • Altadena

"Residents should have evacuation plans in place, organize their emergency evacuation supplies, and have essential evacuation personal belongings easily accessible," U.S. Forest Service officials wrote on the fire incident page. "Vehicles should be fully fueled, facing out in their driveways and ready to leave."

Evacuation orders have been lifted for residents in the East Fork area, which includes Camp Williams and the River Community Center. Residents returning to their homes were advised to use Glendora Mountain Road, as State Route 39 remains closed.

SHELTER SITES

A Red Cross Evacuation Center was re-established at Santa Anita Park, 285 W. Huntington Drive (entry at Gate 5).

L.A. County officials said a shelter site for horses has been established at the Pomona Fairplex (entry at Gate 12).

For residents to the north of the burn zone, accomodations for 300 large animals are available at the Antelope Valley Fairgrounds, 2551 W. Avenue H, Lancaster.

AIR QUALITY

The South Coast Air Quality Management District extended a smoke advisory through Thursday as unhealthy air continues to blanket much of the L.A. Basin and Inland Empire. It's not just local fires though; smoke is also making its way to us from wildfires in Northern California, Oregon and Washington.

Look up the latest air quality info for your area at airnow.gov.

ABOUT MT. WILSON

Smoke rises behind Mt. Wilson Observatory as the Bobcat Fire burns in the Angeles National Forest on Sept. 14, 2020. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

The Mt. Wilson Observatory houses 18 telescopes, many of which were used to make some of the greatest astronomical discoveries of the last century. They include the 100 inch Hooker telescope that Edwin Hubble used in the 1920s to prove that our universe is still expanding.

What appeared to be thick smoke was seen near the observatory mid-day Thursday.

Observatory Director Tom Meneghini said he's afraid they could be seriously impacted if the fire gets close enough.

"The heat can do irreparable damage. Our two big telescopes are historically significant and irreplaceable,” Meneghini said.

However, he said fires have gotten close before and the decades-old firefighting setup at the Observatory is ready to be used again. "We have an inground system of hoses and pumps," he said.

"We have half a million gallons of water ready to pump so that’s all been prepared for any fire professional to come in and take over."

The fire also threatens a seismic station that has recorded earthquake activity for 100 years, seismologist Lucy Jones said via Twitter.

Numerous television and radio stations have transmitters in the area, including our newsroom which broadcasts on the radio at 89.3 KPCC.

HOW WE’RE REPORTING ON THIS

Ryan Fonseca and Mike Roe are gathering updates on the fire.

This is a developing story. We fact check everything and rely only on information from credible sources (think fire, police, government officials and reporters on the ground). Sometimes, however, we make mistakes and/or initial reports turn out to be wrong. In all cases, we strive to bring you the most accurate information in real time and will update this story as new information becomes available.

FIRE RESOURCES

YOUR QUESTIONS OR IDEAS

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Some Civilian Oversight Commissioners Call For Sheriff Villanueva To Resign

Updated
Published
Sheriff Alex Villanueva addressed the news media hours after two of his deputies were shot multiple times in Compton on Saturday, Sept. 12. (Josie Huang/LAist)

Members of the Civilian Oversight Commission for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department called today for Sheriff Alex Villanueva to resign.

At the Commission's virtual meeting, Commissioner Robert Bonner said:

"It is with great reluctance that I am calling for Sheriff Villanueva to resign. I don't take this step lightly and I do so because it's become apparent that he's demonstrated on multiple occasions that he lacks the judgment needed to be the sheriff and that he's unable to provide the leadership needed by the Sheriff's Department. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department itself deserves better and the men and women of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deserve better."

Bonner is a former federal judge and prosecutor and former head of the Drug Enforcement Administration. Bonner also cited Villanueva's reinstatement of a deputy fired for misconduct and his resistance to oversight.

His viewpoint? Bonner said he believed no sheriff in modern history has had such a bad relationship with the Board of Supervisors. He said that relationship is key to a well-functioning Sheriff's Department.

The commission tasked a committee with determining whether to draft a resolution calling on Villanueva to resign, a no-confidence motion, or something else.

At a news conference this afternoon about the fatal shooting of Dijon Kizzee by his deputies in Westmont, the sheriff told reporters he had not heard the calls for his resignation. He accused the commission of crossing the line between "watchdog and attack dog."

His department issued a statement this afternoon saying:

"The fact this motion is even being considered, particularly when two members of our department are recovering from a life-threatening ambush, is morally repugnant and emblematic of the political animosity of the politically-appointed commission.

It is becoming painfully obvious this commission is acting in retaliation against the sheriff for his efforts in investigating potential criminal conduct from county officials and for challenging the legality of subpoenaing the sheriff himself versus the LASD. The sheriff will remain focused on serving the residents of Los Angeles County as he leads the department in investigating the ambush, overseeing the response to the Bobcat Fire evacuations, and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic’s impact to the jail system."

READ THE FULL STORY:

MORE ON THE SHERIFF

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LA Jails — Where 3K Inmates Have Tested Positive For COVID-19 — Gets Recommendations To Stem Virus

Updated
Published
L.A.'s Twin Tower Correctional Facility (Robert Garrova/LAist)

The L.A. County Sheriff’s Department needs to do more to control the spread of coronavirus in the jail population, according to a new report from the Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission.

Commissioners are urging these actions:

  • A continuing and aggressive reduction of the jail population
  • The provision of adequate supplies for cleaning and personal hygiene
  • Testing for any inmate or staff member who has COVID-19 symptoms or has concerns about exposure
  • Testing of inmates before they’re released into the community
  • More video arraignments to reduce movement to and from court

As of Sept. 8, nearly 3,000 inmates had tested positive for COVID-19, according to the report. Six inmates who tested positive for COVID-19 have died in custody, although the report notes that it has not been determined whether the virus caused their deaths.

The L.A. County Sheriff’s Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

READ OUR FULL STORY ABOUT THE FINDINGS

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When Will Census 2020 Come To A Close? End Date Remains In Legal Limbo

Updated
Published
(Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The winding down of the 2020 census must remain on hold nationwide through Sept. 24 at the latest, a federal judge in California has ordered.

The move by U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh throws the national head count further into uncertainty as a coalition led by the National Urban League — and backed by the city of L.A. among other governments — continues a legal fight to provide the U.S. Census Bureau with more time to tally the country's population and review results, which are used to determine the distribution of federal funding and political representation for the next decade.

The challengers are pushing for an extended census schedule that the Trump administration first proposed because of disruptions related to the coronavirus pandemic. Career officials at the bureau have warned that they need more time to avoid risking serious errors in the count that cannot be fixed under a curtailed timeline.

READ THE FULL STORY:

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LA’s Working Moms Are Cutting Hours To Care For Their Kids 

Updated
Published
"That was a hard decision to admit, OK, I'm a stay at home mom now," Delilah Ballesteros said. "That's not what I wanted to be." (Mariana Dale/LAist)

The coronavirus pandemic is disproportionately impacting working moms. More so than men or women without children, they’re cutting their hours and spending more time taking care of their kids.

“This COVID-19 crisis has the capacity to really represent a step back in terms of gender equality because we see moms are carrying more of the load than dads,” says University of Arkansas economist Gema Zamarro.

Her statement is based on research showing that 42% of moms reduced their working hours during the pandemic --compared to 30% of dads -- as well as firsthand experience as the mom of two elementary school aged kids.

We wanted to know how Southern California moms are living this reality, here’s some of what we’ve heard.

  • “My insomnia basically was just at a new level of not being able to sleep at night because I was so uncertain and being a single mom and already on a low income, it's already been hard to make things work.” -- Loretta Madrigal, West Covina
  • “I am worried when time comes to go to this childcare, that whatever we find, that it’s not going to be my first, second, third, fourth, or even maybe my fifth choice.” -- Maggie Kelley, Studio City
  • “That was a hard decision to admit, 'OK, I'm a stay at home mom now,' because that's not what I wanted to be. I wanted to be a working mom, but that's what my family needs right now.” -- Delilah Ballesteros, Glendale
  • “It seems like it honestly just gets harder and harder every day because whenever I'm at work and I'm exposed to hundreds of customers a day ... I have to take my precautions, because I have a young child. I have older family and it's not worth it.” -- Ashley Wayne, Lancaster
  • “I have friends that say like, ‘I can't believe your kid’s in day care.’ I'm like, ‘Look, this is what works for my family. This is what works for me and this is how I can make money.’ My child loves it. I can see the difference of like, just emotionally how happy is going there.” – Jaylee Maruk, Studio City

READ THE FULL STORY:

HOW ARE YOU TAKING CARE OF YOUR FAMILY?

  • Share your experience with LAist here -- we might use it in a story.

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Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission Meets To Discuss Handling Of Protests, Shootings

Updated
Published
Sheriff Alex Villanueva (L.A. County Sheriff's Department)

The Sheriff Civilian Oversight Commission is meeting now to discuss how the department has handled public protests, and resolutions condemning violence and supporting an independent investigation into fatal deputy shootings.

The commission will also discuss a report on the Sheriff's Department's efforts to contain COVID-19 in the jails.

Our public safety reporter Frank Stoltze is covering the meeting.

If you would like to participate or listen to the meeting, visit https://bit.ly/34ewI9I to register and join via computer or smart phone. When prompted, enter the event password: COC123. To listen only, call (415) 655-0001 and enter the access code: 145 317 0941.

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El Dorado Fire: Roughly 19,000 Acres Burned, Containment At 66%

Updated
Published
Big Bear Hot Shots wait for the El Dorado Fire to drop to a roadway before going to work. (Courtesy San Bernardino National Forest)

This story is no longer being updated. Follow our coverage of the El Dorado Fire for Friday, Sept. 18>>

Yesterday's coverage:

The El Dorado Fire continues to burn in the San Bernardino National Forest, forcing evacuations of thousands of homes in mountain communities.

Here's what we know about the blaze so far today:

THE BASICS

  • Acreage: 19,098
  • Containment: 66%
  • Structures destroyed: 4 homes, 6 other structures
  • Structures damaged: 2 homes, 4 other structures
  • Residences evacuated: 3,467
  • Structures threatened: 26,031
  • Personnel: 1,351 firefighters
  • Injuries: 12

The El Dorado Fire began on Saturday, September 5, with a bang — literally — when a firework from a gender reveal party in Yucaipa ignited a blaze that has threatened thousands of homes and caused the mandatory evacuation of tens of thousands of residents.

Forest officials said Thursday the fire has settled into a low-intensity burn, and is behaving similar to "an ideal prescribed burn."

"Low intensity fire that does not grow out of control benefits our wildlands and is actually vital to the survival of several species, which is surprising since fire is one of our greatest tools and one of our most destructive forces," officials wrote on the fire incident page.

Firefighters successfully defended the community of Angelus Oaks overnight, which has been threatened in recent days.

The blaze reached Forsee Creek overnight and is still advancing toward San Bernardino Peak, aided by upcanyon winds.

To the north, the blaze appraoched Highway 38, and firefighters used the roadway itself as a fuel-break. Retardant lines dropped along the roadway were successful in keeping the blaze in check there.

Forest officials also had a message for residents who might be alarmed by what they're seeing north of Highway 38 on satellite imagery available online through Modis.

Modis is an instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua EOS Satellites and measure thermal and infrared detections. This can create confusion as anything emitting heat registers in Modis, including smoke AND fire-fighting equipment. What communities are perceiving as spot fires across Hwy 38 is likely smoke or equipment operating in the area. As of this update [just before 9a.m.], the El Dorado Fire has NOT crossed Highway 38.

EVACUATIONS

Mandatory evacuations remain in effect for the following communities (detailed map here):

  • Mountain Home Village
  • Forest Falls
  • Angelus Oaks
  • Seven Oaks
  • Barton Flats / Jenks Lake Area east to Onyx Summit

A Red Cross evacuation center is open at the Redlands East Valley High School, 31000 E. Colton Ave.

Big Bear residents are not currently under any evacuation warnings or orders, but local officials there have issued a fire advisory, asking residents "to closely monitor the El Dorado Fire, and take appropriate precautions based on your individual circumstances."

CLOSURES

CalFire Captain Fernando Herrera in his SUV along Highway 38 during the El Dorado Fire. (Sharon McNary/LAist)

Highway 38 remains closed between Bryant Street and Lake Williams Drive.

The San Bernardino National Forest remains closed through Sept. 21 — along with all other national forests in California.

AIR QUALITY

The South Coast Air Quality Management District extended a smoke advisory through Thursday as unhealthy air continues to blanket much of the L.A. Basin and Inland Empire. It's not just local fires though; smoke is also making its way to us from wildfires in Northern California, Oregon and Washington.

Look up the latest air quality info for your area at airnow.gov.

CAUSE

The family behind the party where authorities say a pyrotechnic device was set off tried to put out the fire and called 911, but it was too late. They have cooperated with authorities, but Cal Fire spokesperson Captain Bennett Malloy says it's possible they could face misdemeanor charges:

"Some of the laws they could have broken: a public resource code where you cause a fire on somebody else's land, or, in California under a penal code, there's provisions for what's called recklessly causing a fire. And that may be the case with this fire, but that would be up to the district attorney to determine."

Prosecutors could pursue felony charges if someone is hurt or killed, or if homes are damaged by the fire. Though no charges had been filed yet.

HOW WE’RE REPORTING ON THIS

This is a developing story. We fact check everything and rely only on information from credible sources (think fire, police, government officials and reporters on the ground). Sometimes, however, we make mistakes and/or initial reports turn out to be wrong. In all cases, we strive to bring you the most accurate information in real time and will update this story as new information becomes available.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

For the latest information straight from local emergency officials, check the following websites and social media accounts:

FIRE RESOURCES

YOUR QUESTIONS OR IDEAS

There's a COVID-19 Outbreak At ICE's Adelanto Detention Center

Updated
Published
The Adelanto U.S. Immigration and Enforcement Processing Center, in San Bernardino County, operated by GEO Group, Inc. (GEO) a Florida-based company specializing in privatized corrections.

At least 38 immigrant detainees have tested positive for the coronavirus in an outbreak at the Adelanto ICE Processing Center, a privately-operated detention facility in San Bernardino County.

According to a court filing on Wednesday, a lawyer for the federal government said in an email that a total of 80 detainees were tested between two housing units after six people were reported positive in those units earlier this week.

Of the 80 detainees, 38 people had tested positive and the remaining test results are still pending, the attorney said.

Six detainees have been hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment, according to another court filing Thursday, in a declaration by Gabriel Valdez, assistant field office director of ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations in Los Angeles.

A spokesperson for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said Thursday that at least 80 detainees have been tested so far and others may be tested as a result of contract tracing. As of Thursday, 39 had tested positive for COVID-19.

"All have been quarantined and are receiving care. Consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, those who may have come in contact with these individuals have also been cohorted and are being monitored for symptoms," the ICE spokesperson, Alexx Pons, said in an emailed statement.

Prior to this outbreak, the detention center had a cumulative total of 14 confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic. All of the 14 cases involved people who newly arrived at the detention center, the attorney said.

In April, the ACLU of Southern California sued ICE, asking for the release of detainees at the center because of concerns over the coronavirus and the lack of social distancing. That case is pending in the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

There have been a number of COVID-19 outbreaks at other immigrant detention facilities across the country, including Otay Mesa Detention Center in San Diego, where more than 160 people tested positive for COVID-19 and 1 detainee died from the coronavirus.

In light of the recent outbreak, the ACLU of Southern California has filed a termporary restraining order, asking for immediate testing of all detainees at Adelanto and medical isolation of all people with confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Margaret Hellerstein, an attorney with Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project, said one of her clients, who's being held in one of the affected housing units, had symptoms for days before being tested.

"[He had] extreme tiredness, muscle aches, sore throat, chills, runny nose, headache and lack of appetite," she said.

Hellerstein said he was first told by a nurse to gargle with salt water because his symptoms were attribtued to the poor air quality (due to wildfire smoke), and then he was given over-the-counter cold medicine.

"I want him to get better treatment," Hellerstein said.

UPDATES:

3:59: This article was updated to include information about how many detainees have been hospitalized.

2:55 p.m.: This article was updated with a comment from an ICE spokesperson.

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Morning Briefing: LA County Sheriff’s Disinformation Tactics

Updated
Published
Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva at the graduation ceremony for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Academy class 433 at East Los Angeles College, Friday, January 4, 2019. Kyle Grillot for LAist

Never miss a morning briefing. Subscribe today to get our A.M. newsletter delivered to your inbox.

Good morning, L.A.

Over the weekend, KPCC/LAist reporter Josie Huang was detained by L.A. County Sheriff’s Deputies while she was documenting an arrest. News of the incident spread rapidly on social and mainstream media, and along with it, a flood of disinformation about what actually happened that night.

Chief among the disinformation purveyors, it turns out, was Sheriff Alex Villanueva himself. KPCC Investigative Reporter Aaron Mendelson dug into what Villanueva has said about the arrest, and juxtaposed it with video evidence. In a disturbing number of cases, Villanueva is plainly inaccurate.

We’ll continue to report on this story as it unfolds, in addition to the investigation into the shooting of two Sheriff’s deputies. In the meantime, keep reading for more on what’s happening in L.A. today, and stay safe out there.

Jessica P. Ogilvie


Coming Up Today, September 17

The coronavirus pandemic is disproportionately impacting working moms. More so than men or women without children, they’re cutting their work hours and spending more time taking care of their kids. Researchers say this could hurt their careers years down the road. Mariana Dale reports.

Attend a new drive-in movie experience in Chinatown, discover the scents of mummification, catch a sneak peek of the latest play from the Latino Theater Company, and more. Christine N. Ziemba has this week’s best online and IRL events.

Never miss an LAist story. Sign up for our daily newsletters.


The Past 24 Hours In LA

Policing Law Enforcement: Sheriff Alex Villanueva is sticking to his narrative about the arrest of KPCC/LAist correspondent Josie Huang – a narrative contradicted by video evidence.

Wildfires: The Bobcat fire has burned 44,393 acres in the Angeles National Forest, and is at 3% containment. The El Dorado fire has burned 18,092 acres and is at 60% containment.

Coronavirus Updates: New guidelines will be released very soon on theme parks and amusement parks in the time of COVID-19, as well as other areas/industries/sectors. Respiratory symptoms from coronavirus infection and smoke inhalation are too similar to distinguish without a full medical workup, which is complicating the jobs of health care workers.

Podcast: In this week’s episode of LAist Studios’ podcast, Servant of Pod with Nick Quah, Nick talks to Gretchen Rubin, the best-selling author behind books like “The Happiness Project” and “The Four Tendencies.”


Photo Of The Day

Fans and supporters gathered outside the Stanley Mosk Courthouse in downtown to protest Britney Spears' conservatorship.

(Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

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