Video: Wild Car Chase Ends At USC Near Coliseum

A wild car chase that began in Cheviot Hills ended on the USC campus just outside the Coliseum where the USC-Arizona football game was underway.

The chase began just before 8:10 p.m. Thursday on the eastbound Santa Monica Freeway at Manning Avenue, CHP Officer Ming Hsu told City News Service. Traffic had slowed to 5 mph but one driver decided he couldn't wait and drove to the right shoulder, where he attempted to speed past the other cars.

Two California Highway Patrol officers were attending to a disabled vehicle when they spotted the suspect. One officer gave pursuit and the chase was on.

The suspect's car left the freeway and collided with several vehicles as he headed east, Hsu said. Other officers joined the chase and, at Vermont Avenue and Adams Boulevard, an officer executed a pit maneuver, which caused the suspect's car to spin out but only temporarily stopped him.

NBC 4 reports that the suspect pretended to surrender, then drove off again.

At that point, at least one officer opened fire on the vehicle, but the suspect was not hit and drove off again, racing down Exposition Boulevard and heading east to Figueroa Street.

The chase ended about 8:45 p.m. on the USC campus near Vermont Avenue and 37th Place, where the suspect drove up onto a walkway and hit some landscaping, Hsu said. Finding himself at a dead end, he get out of the car and ran.

CHP officers encountered lingering crowds as the USC-Arizona football game at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum was in the second quarter. According to NBC, football fans helped point out the suspect to officers as he fled on foot.

Broadcast video showed him, with his shirt bloodied, being taken into custody, but Hsu said the suspect had not been injured in the chase.

The 22-year-old suspect, whose named was not released, was taken into custody.

USC students received texts messages saying there was a"police-related incident" and to stay away from campus, then a message that the incident had been resolved, NBC reports. Since the texts were sent with "XXX-XXX" instead of the time and details of the incident, students had little idea what was going on.